Mastering Census & Military Records – W. Daniel Quillen

Mastering Census and Military Records by Daniel Quillen.jpg

 

Synopsis (from Goodreads): 

This book covers the use of two of the most effective sets of genealogical information available to genealogists: Census and military records. Quillen’s Essentials of Genealogy includes: what they are, how to use them, pitfalls, and issues concerning the information found.

My Rating: 3 Stars – Good reference material, but vexing formatting issues

My Review: 

This short, though useful, reference by Daniel Quillen is full of pertinent information, especially for the beginner genealogist. The book largely reads like a stream of consciousness, which doesn’t detract from it. The author uses examples in his own family to illustrate potential problems and their potential solutions, so readers can more readily apply the tips to their own family searches.

One thing that did throw me off about the book is the apparent formatting issue. It may be something that slipped past during editing, but sometimes the last sentence of a paragraph on one page will end up smack in the middle of the next!

So if one paragraph is about Daniel Quillen, and the next is about Daniel Quillen’s mother, and the next after that is about Daniel Quillen’s grandmother, the last sentence of the paragraph on Daniel himself will end up sandwiched in between the paragraphs about his mother and grandmother!

It’s quite vexing while reading, truth be told. It wasn’t an issue throughout the entire book, but I did notice it several times during the first third of it.

All in all, I think this is a fine resource, and will likely be reading it again to brush up on census and military record tips.

Recommended for: Beginner genealogists

Scrapbooking Your Family History – Maureen Taylor

Scrapbooking Your Family History by Maureen Taylor.jpg
Synopsis (from Goodreads):
Readers will learn how to:
– Choose items already in their family’s possession for presentation in a scrapbook
– Find and identify family photographs
– Locate and interpret historical documents about their ancestors
– Discover new information from old postcards, keepsakes and other family artifacts
– Put their ancestors in historical perspective
– Tell the story of their family in different ways
– Take their research beyond the limits of a heritage album
My Rating: 4 Stars – Worth re-visiting
My Review:
The book is beautifully put together, as you might hope for a book about scrap-booking. The illustrations are relevant and pleasing to the eye, and the design echoes that of a scrapbook.

However, while the book does carry a heavy scrap-booking theme, there are quite a few tips and how-tos in regard to genealogy research as a whole. There’s a timeline of the history of handwriting, of genealogical milestones, instructions on how to care for your documents and photos (archival materials only, acid free, and keep your newspapers, paperclips, and staples away from your photos and documents!), and commands to double-check and cite your sources.

I would say this book is largely a very visual, entertaining “getting started in genealogy book.”

However there are sections dedicated to picking themes for your books, how to organize them prettily and properly, what paper to use, a section on rubber stamping, stickers, and ways to save money during your family history scrap-booking journey.

The book stretches beyond the promised subject matter in a pleasant way. I would say it’s a worthwhile read for beginners, as well as those vetted in the world of genealogy, who are ready to begin scrap-booking as a way to showcase their years of intensive research.

Who Would Benefit: Beginning genealogists, and experienced genealogists interested in a new way to showcase their years of intense research, as well as those non-genealogists who want to make family scrapbooks and make sure their books last for their children, and great-grandchildren to enjoy.

The Kraken Sea – E. Catherine Tobler

The Kraken Sea by Catherine E. Tobler

Synopsis (from Goodreads):

Fifteen-year-old Jackson is different from the other children at the foundling hospital. Scales sometimes cover his arms. Tentacles coil just below his skin. Despite this Jackson tries to fit in with the other children. He tries to be normal for Sister Jerome Grace and the priests. But when a woman asks for a boy like him, all that changes. His name is pinned to his jacket and an orphan train whisks him across the country to Macquarie’s.

At Macquarie’s, Jackson finds a home unlike any he could have imagined. The bronze lions outside the doors eat whomever they deem unfit to enter, the hallways and rooms shift and change at will, and Cressida – the woman who adopted him – assures him he no longer has to hide what he is. But new freedoms hide dark secrets. There are territories, allegiances, and a kraken in the basement that eats shadows.

As Jackson learns more about the new world he’s living in and about who he is, he has to decide who he will stand with: Cressida, the woman who gave him a home and a purpose, or Mae, the black-eyed lion tamer with a past as enigmatic as his own. The Kraken Sea is a fast paced adventure full of mystery, Fates, and writhing tentacles just below the surface, and in the middle of it all is a boy searching for himself.

My rating: 2.5 Stars

My Review:

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

The Kraken Sea is a short book, a novella, that I would describe as a fantasy coming-of-age story.

Jackson is an orphan who gets adopted by a mysterious woman called The Widow. He’s drawn from his average, if miserable, life at the orphanage, and is chucked into one full of magical creatures, and unspoken rules which, when broken, mean death or serious bodily harm. There’s a steep learning curve as Jackson struggles to understand who and what he is, and how he fits into the grand scheme of things.

A few things I liked about this book: I love the idea of a magical world enmeshed with the ordinary human one. One that only some humans are privy to. One where anyone you see, could in fact just be in human form, but certainly inhuman.

I love the idea of this woman, Cressida, gathering these inhuman people and mystical creatures, and giving them a home. I even love the idea that she may have nefarious intentions for this.

A few things that bothered me: The book needs more editing, and quite a bit of it. There were sentence fragments, misused words, and typos that slipped past the spell checker.  Characterization, character development, pacing, and the plot need tweaking. There were a few formatting issues as well, such as breaks in the story that weren’t clearly noted.

The author used some intense imagery, and that was both a boon and a detriment to the story. There were beautiful lines like this, “These human-like shapes peeled away from clotted darkness; Jackson was certain if he was close enough, he would have heard a wet puckering kiss as they separated from the black.”

And then there was a clumsy descriptions of a mirror that I had to take a second to realize was indeed a mirror, and not some magical new thing I needed to pay attention to. Also, there was a tendency for the writing to get too abstract during every intense scene, from Jackson’s heady moments with Mae, to brawls with the neighborhood boys.

Overall, I like the book, but I think it could almost be considered a work in progress. It needs a good polish.

Type of Readers Suited for: Readers who want something quick and easy.

Additional notes: The cover art is beautiful.